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August 30, 2017


Houston Strong


Houston2

Look at this H charm and jump ring I made with sterling silver wire. It's to honor the people of #Houston. I'll make you one and ship it to you if you email me a new screen shot of a minimum donation of $100 to American Red Cross (for #hurricaneharvey ) or Southern Baptist Disaster Relief, Houston Food Bank or Hurricane Harvey Relief Fund. Screen shots must be dated from this moment forward (Previous donations are great but this is to encourage new or second donations.) jenny@crescendoh.com /// chain not included///please allow 2 weeks for the charm to be created, packed, and shipped #HoustonStrong #riseup

Houston

August 29, 2017


552 Summertime Rolls


Summertime

552 Summertime Rolls
6x8 inches :: original oil painting on gessobord
Click here to Bid or Buy Now
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I referenced an image by @noirboudior for this work. What a summer it's been.

#summertimerolls
It brought peace to my mind
In the summertime
And it rolled
Summer ... oh ...
Oh ... the summertime rolls
#janesaddiction

August 28, 2017


Jean Valjean, Hurricane Harvey, and Osteen's True Colors


Romanticism

I remember learning about Romanticism in high school and being struck to realize that it has nothing to do with conventional ideas of love and romance. Romanticism is a movement that reaches not only the visual arts but also literature & music. It's a movement that shines light on the need to take care of the underdog, the downtrodden, the suffering.

Like Victor Hugo's magnificent literary work: Les Miserables ... where the Bishop tells the authorities to not arrest Jean Valjean because the silver found on him is silver that the Bishop gave him, not silver that he stole. Jean Valjean can't believe this grace given to him by the Bishop because he did in fact steal the silver. And the Bishop says to Jean Valjean ... take the silver and rise up and succeed. God. I weep every time I think about that exchange.

Paintings by French Romantics like Gericault and  Delacroix exude the passion that they felt ... particularly regarding oppression based on class. Their works show breathtaking uprisings of a downtrodden people who overcome class oppression.

Speaking of the downtrodden. Have you seen the devastation and the havoc that Hurricane Harvey has caused on the people of Houston? The images of the suffering are heart-wrenching. These images are available to all ... including Joel Osteen, head of a megachurch in Houston that has not been flooded and that could house and aid thousands of people ... only if he opens the doors.

But Osteen and his team members have shown their true colors. And they look nothing like Jean Valjean's Bishop. The doors of the megachurch will remain closed, he said, but dollars will be accepted through his website to provide aid.

There ARE churches that open doors to help the downtrodden. That's part of the conceptual reason why churches are allowed to collect money without paying taxes. Because they're supposed to help. For free. And that's why I used to wear a cross around my neck. But I took it off in my 20s when I realized that most crosses on necks reflect closed doors, closed hearts of the greedy who use tax-free money to build shiny things that belong more to the over-the-top Rococo art movement of extravagance and jet-set life of the Osteens and nothing to do with Romanticism. They turn scripture into cliches of privilege to help them sleep ... like "we aren't perfect, just forgiven."

Maybe one day I'll wear that cross again ... when I feel that #fakechristianity no longer has a stranglehold on Christianity.

August 24, 2017


551 That I'd Been Crying


Crying551 That I'd Been Crying
8 x 10 inches :: original oil painting on gessobord
Click here to Bid or Buy
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This is the demo painting I made while teaching a private painting session today for a group of lovely artists. Our entire group used the same photo reference that I used for the painting I made yesterday. I really enjoyed the way everyone's work came out. After all of the artists left the studio, I turned up the music, added some additional strokes, and a line from one of my favorite #RoyOrbison songs ...

I was all right for a while, I could smile for a while
But I saw you last night, you held my hand so tight
As you stopped to say "Hello" You wished me well, you couldn't tell

That I'd been #crying ...

August 23, 2017


Matters of Importance (Again)


Matters

When I was a new immigrant to this country, I was the only girl of Korean descent in the elementary school that I attended in #Bakersfield, California.There was a bully named Andrea who used to slap my face regularly.I told my family about this and Marilyn, from our sponsoring American family, started coaching me with my limited English skills and told me the next time it happened, I should look at Andrea in the face and say "Stop it!" And so I did.But it didn't work.

 

So the next thing I knew, Marilyn accompanied me to school & asked me "Where's Andrea?" I pointed her out & witnessed Marilyn going over to talk to Andrea & telling her in no uncertain terms that she was to stop slapping me.

 

It worked. Andrea heard Marilyn loud and clear. Even though I was different, I mattered. 

If someone had said to Marilyn "But what about Andrea? Doesn't she matter too?" Marilyn probably would have said "Of course she matters. But I'm here not because someone is slapping Andrea. I'm here because Jenny is being slapped. And I'm not going to not do or say anything about that." I think that when a nation has a long-standing track record of killing unarmed Black people, it is not illogical for someone witnessing that to speak up. And when the witness stands to speak, they may say something like "Stop it!" Or a collective community of witnesses may say it another way, like #BlackLivesMatter

 

To me, those three words don't mean that other lives don't matter. Because of course Jenny matters & Andrea matters too. This great nation protects the right for Marilyn to speak up and get involved & it protects a collective group of like-minded & concerned witnesses to stand together ... to state the case and shine light on matters of importance.

 

(I am re-posting today, this story of mine which I originally posted on July 12, 2016. #IStandWithKaepernick )

 


550 First Star


In solidarity

550 First Star
8x10 inches :: original oil painting on gessobord
Click here to Bid or Buy
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I referenced a photo of @elizachemendia as captured by @agataserge and curated by @theportraitprOject for this work. After I painted the portrait, I painted a Star of David onto her blouse, inspired by #BillyJoel who recently gave a concert wearing a Star of David on his jacket ... to simply and powerfully protest the latest resurgence of Neo-Nazis in America who have become emboldened to march without hoods, many wearing MAGA hats, chanting "Jews will not replace us" and "Fuck you faggots."

During the Holocaust (1941 to 1945), Nazis in Germany hated the Jewish people and targeted them as scapegoats for societal woes and systematically murdered approximately 6 million of them.

How did a people get to that place of hating a group so much that they systematically murdered them? Could it happen again? Only if we put our heads in the sand and avoid resisting the ignorant madness.

#resistancelog #resist #artdoesnotbackdown #artandactivismlog #allaprima

 

August 22, 2017


Subversion of Freedom


OkeefeI was recently at a fabulous dinner party with artist and professor friends hosted by my art mentor and friend, Darlene. On one of her walls was a print of a nude photo of Georgia O'Keeffe that had been taken by photographer Alfred Stieglitz. I had known of O'Keeffe's flower paintings but I had no idea that she had allowed so many nudes of herself to be taken through the artistic eye of Stieglitz.

Within the Expressionist movement ... where tensions that were leading to WW1 were rising, many artists including painters  like Paul Gaugin wanted to return to primitivism and find freedom. Freedom from the forces of war, freedom from social convention ... just freedom plain and pure. This revolt against worldwide tension caused artists like Gauguin to start painting nudes as they viewed nudes to be the ultimate reflection of freedom.

Prior to Expressionism, Impressionist artists like Édouard Manet also painted nudes but with much more controversy as the viewing public felt shocked by the kind of vivid nudity that Manet painted.

After the dinner party with Darlene and friends, I looked up the photos of Georgia O'Keeffe which are just so achingly beautiful. The photos were also used to reference to make many beautiful paintings.

Earlier this year when I turned 50 years old, I also had my first nude photos taken through the artistic eye of @narcissusholmes. I had always thought of getting nudes taken and I think at the age of 50 I thought to myself: "Life is short ... let's do this." Though at the time I hadn't known of O'Keeffe's nude photos, I in hindsight feel an extra connection with O'Keeffe. I understand why she had so many taken. Because she likely felt what I felt from the process and the product ... which is freedom from social convention ... freedom plain and pure.

There's always controversy when it comes to freedom. Manet felt it when he released his paintings of nudes ... and perhaps it's less so today but controversy and judgement still exist ... which is why I go to the trouble of editing the photos (sepia tones of O'Keeffe and black&whites of me to not be kicked off of social media). There's something about the audacity of freedom that is inherently unnerving to convention. True freedom is always subversive.

August 21, 2017


Vincent's Empathy & Activism


VincentI get choked up when thinking about Vincent van Gogh. A Post-Impressionist artist who painted a huge body of work. Surprisingly, he painted for only 10 years ... his last 10 years of his life. And it is through the act of painting that he finally felt that he had found a way to do something good for humankind. Previous to his painting life, he had been kicked out of the clergy for being overly empathetic to the poor. That he cared too much for them.

Though many of his works are of landscapes and flowers and even scenes of the bourgeoisie, his work also encompasses paintings of poor laborers and families working in the fields.

I get choked up because he didn't have to go out of his way to find subjects like poor field workers with dark skin. It would have been more convenient (and perhaps more lucrative) for him to depict just the convenient. But by taking the time to paint the poor working class, he was making a statement. He was championing humanism ... to make the case to the world with his strokes and pigments that all humans, even the marginalized, have value. We look at his body of work today and think what a genius he was but in his lifetime, he didn't enjoy the applause nor the sales of the viewing audience. I think he sold only one painting during his life.

Ironically, within the Post-Impressionist period, there is a movement called Art Nouveau that emerged in Belgium, where everything was about making everything pretty, in an effort to champion decorative arts. Certainly not a movement that would make room for paintings of poor people working in the fields.

Truthfully, I like seeing it all. The pretty, the troubling, the realistic, the decorative, the abstract. I feel for van Gogh who was so tortured by his unusual degree of empathy that ultimately became debilitating ... and I admire him for painting and being the activist that he was, regardless of the lack of acclaim or sales.

Perhaps the person who recently wrote me and asked that I keep politics out of my art might not realize that when she is looking at a van Gogh, she IS looking at politics. And she IS looking at his activism.

Sometimes it might feel that activism looks and feels a certain way. Loud. Shocking. Bubbling with outrage. What van Gogh teaches me is that at other times, activism feels different ... a kind of feeling that perplexes some because the work isn't super pretty or decorative ... just quietly reflective of a reality that is beyond the convenient yet steeped in the outrage just the same.

(PS: I also think loud and shocking activist art has value. I'll talk about that in another post)

#artandactivismlog

August 20, 2017


549 What You Do


Whatyoudo549 What You Do
18x 24 inches :: original acrylic painting on stretched canvas
Click here to Buy
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This is the second time using a reference of a fashion model from a fashion magazine that a colleague brought into the studio a few weeks ago. After I painted her this time, I abstracted her and then added some wise words by Ralph Waldo Emerson. I especially like that I made her eyes different colors.


Peace = Radical Nuclear Disarmament


Peace

The peace sign is a universally loved symbol. Maybe it's because it seems today to symbolize a zen-like energy ... not too radical, not too activist, not too political ... especially if it's made with dried rose petals ... or adorned with other design elements that don't rock the boat. Like ... peace and good vibes and all you need is love dude ... and let's keep politics out of it, dude.

Interestingly, the symbol was created in 1958 by British artist, Gerald Holtom, as a form of activism to denounce war and nuclear weapons. Specifically, it was to support and unite the Aldermaston March which took place in the UK, which drew thousands of marchers calling for nuclear disarmament. Quite radical. Quite political.

Holtom cleverly used the Naval Flag Semaphore characters to design the peace sign. At sea, flags (one in each hand) are held by a person in different ways to signal different letters. The Letter N is communicated when a person holds the flags so both arms are straight and positioned in equidistance from the body, with the flags pointing downward.

 

Peace3

The letter D is made when one arm is pointed straight up and the other straight down so that we see the person with flags as a straight vertical line.

Peace2

Holtom combined these two letters: N and D to create the peace sign, to signify Nuclear Disarmament.

I'm always surprised when I occasionally get someone who I barely know to write me and say "I love your art. Please don't put politics in it." To which I say:

  • I don't exist to do things to make your life feel more convenient
  • Whether you can see it or not, everything is political ... even seemingly innocuous decorative art is political ...in terms of who makes it/with what supplies it is made/during what time of day it is made ... and who ends up acquiring it.

I believe the language of art is multi-faceted. Those who allow it to communicate activism (like Holtom) do so with great effort to create original content that can trigger contemplation. Activist art frequently makes people uneasy ... but I believe it always leads to increased contemplation, which is wonderful, and powerful. Because I think what precedes peace is justice and what precedes justice is the presentation of details of a topic (whether it's about bombs, race, gender, class, environment, health, education, etc.) that sometimes takes a lifetime to really discuss and understand.

#artandactivismlog

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